To What Extent Should Less-Developed Countries Enforce Intellectual Property?

28 Pages Posted: 6 Jan 2005

See all articles by Gilles Saint-Paul

Gilles Saint-Paul

University of Toulouse I - GREMAQ-IDEI; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute); IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Date Written: October 2004

Abstract

This Paper discusses a number of issues in the context of the debate on intellectual property in less developed countries (LDCs). It starts by discussing the consequences of IP enforcement in LDCs for global innovation and welfare in poorer countries. It then considers the costs and benefits of IP enforcement for a small, open LDC, abstracting from global issues. Finally, it discusses the protential merits of an industrial policy based on open source software. The analysis suggests that the view that it is best for LDCs to free-ride on the global IP regime is overblown.

Keywords: Piracy, intellectual property, innovation, growth, comparative advantage

JEL Classification: F12, F13, O30, O34

Suggested Citation

Saint-Paul, Gilles, To What Extent Should Less-Developed Countries Enforce Intellectual Property? (October 2004). CEPR Discussion Paper No. 4713. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=644225

Gilles Saint-Paul (Contact Author)

University of Toulouse I - GREMAQ-IDEI ( email )

Manufacture des Tabacs
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Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

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United Kingdom

CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute)

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Munich, DE-81679
Germany

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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