The Persistent Segregation of Girls into Lower-Paying Jobs While in School

12 Pages Posted: 30 Mar 2005

See all articles by Peter Kooreman

Peter Kooreman

Tilburg University - Center and Faculty of Economics and Business Administration; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Date Written: March 2005

Abstract

This paper analyzes gender differences in jobs while in high school. The availability of school class based samples with detailed information on teenage jobs allows for a comparison of the behavior of boys and girls who are in the same school class, and thus have virtually identical education levels. Even within these highly homogeneous groups, boys earn substantially more than girls. The earnings gap cannot be explained by differences in participation rates and hours of work, nor by gender wage gaps within job types. It is entirely due to the fact that girls work more in job types with relatively low wages, in particular babysitting. During the period considered, 1984-2001, the gender patterns of jobs while in school largely remained unchanged.

Keywords: labor market, gender differences, teenage behavior

JEL Classification: J16, J22

Suggested Citation

Kooreman, Peter, The Persistent Segregation of Girls into Lower-Paying Jobs While in School (March 2005). IZA Discussion Paper No. 1535. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=695144

Peter Kooreman (Contact Author)

Tilburg University - Center and Faculty of Economics and Business Administration ( email )

P.O. Box 90153
Tilburg, 5000 LE
Netherlands

HOME PAGE: http://www.peterkooreman.nl

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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