The Social Security Early Entitlement Age in a Structural Model of Retirement and Wealth

Posted: 1 May 2005

See all articles by Alan L. Gustman

Alan L. Gustman

Dartmouth College - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Thomas L. Steinmeier

Texas Tech University - Department of Economics and Geography

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Abstract

A structural life cycle model of retirement and wealth attributes retirement peaks at both ages 62 and 65 to Social Security rules and wide heterogeneity in time preferences. Those with high discount rates often retire at 62. They have few assets and heavily value lost benefits from working after 62, largely ignoring potential increases in later benefits. Declining actuarial adjustments beginning at 65 induce those with low discount rates to retire at 65. Raising the Social Security early entitlement age to 64 induces 5 percent of the population to delay retiring, shifting the retirement spike from 62 to 64.

Keywords: Social Security, Retirement, Saving, Life Cycle, Heterogeneity

JEL Classification: H55, J14, J26, J32, D31, E21, D91, I3

Suggested Citation

Gustman, Alan L. and Steinmeier, Thomas L., The Social Security Early Entitlement Age in a Structural Model of Retirement and Wealth. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=709063

Alan L. Gustman (Contact Author)

Dartmouth College - Department of Economics ( email )

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National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Thomas L. Steinmeier

Texas Tech University - Department of Economics and Geography ( email )

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United States
806-742-2201 (Phone)

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