Remote Control: The Rise of Electronic Cultural Policy

The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 597, pp. 122-133, January 2005

Posted: 4 May 2005  

Siva Vaidhyanathan

University of Virginia - School of Law

Abstract

Since the early 1990s, the United States has been formulating, executing, and imposing a form of "electronic cultural policy." This phrase means two things: a stategenerated set of policies to encourage or mandate design standards for electronic devices and dictate a particular set of cultural choices; and the cultural choices themselves, which have been embedded in the design and software of electronic goods. The goal of electronic cultural policy has been to encourage and enable "remote control," shifting decisions over the use of content from the user to the vendor. The intended macro effects of such micro policies are antidemocratic. Their potential has created the possibility of a whole new set of forms of cultural domination by a handful of powerful global institutions. Yet so far, the actual consequences of these policies have been different from those intended, igniting activism and disobedience on a global scale.

Keywords: Intellectual property, trade policy, cultural policy, copyright, encryption, cultural imperialism

Suggested Citation

Vaidhyanathan, Siva, Remote Control: The Rise of Electronic Cultural Policy. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 597, pp. 122-133, January 2005. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=713022

Siva Vaidhyanathan (Contact Author)

University of Virginia - School of Law ( email )

580 Massie Road
Charlottesville, VA 22903
United States

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
1,815