Continuity and Change in Corporate Governance: Comparing Germany and Japan

11 Pages Posted: 29 Jul 2005

See all articles by Gregory Jackson

Gregory Jackson

Freie Universität Berlin

Andreas Moerke

German Institute for Japanese Studies - Department of Business Administration

Abstract

Germany and Japan are often seen deviating from an economic model of shareholder control and thereby as being similar by virtue of their mutual contrast with the US. Given the common challenges for bank-based and stakeholder-oriented models of corporate governance, Germany-Japan comparison seems particularly timely. This article provides an introductory overview and analysis for the Special Issue by comparing recent developments in corporate law reform, banking and finance, and employment in Germany and Japan. While rejecting arguments for international convergence, we discuss this evidence of simultaneous continuity and change in corporate governance as a potential form of hybridisation of national models or renegotiation of stakeholder coalitions in German and Japanese firms. One consequence is the growing diversity of firm-level corporate governance practices within national systems.

Suggested Citation

Jackson, Gregory and Moerke, Andreas, Continuity and Change in Corporate Governance: Comparing Germany and Japan. Corporate Governance: An International Review, Vol. 13, No. 3, pp. 351-361, May 2005. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=725883

Gregory Jackson (Contact Author)

Freie Universität Berlin ( email )

Boltzmannstrasse 20
D-14195 Berlin, 14195
Germany

HOME PAGE: http://www.wiwiss.fu-berlin.de/institute/management/jackson/team/gjackson/index.html

Andreas Moerke

German Institute for Japanese Studies - Department of Business Administration ( email )

Tokyo, Chiyoda-ku 102-0074
Japan

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