Gender, Body Mass and Economic Status

29 Pages Posted: 16 Jun 2005 Last revised: 1 Jul 2010

See all articles by Dalton Conley

Dalton Conley

New York University (NYU) - Department of Sociology; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Rebecca Glauber

New York University - Center for Advanced Social Science Research

Date Written: May 2005

Abstract

Previous research on the effect of body mass on economic outcomes has used a variety of methods to mitigate endogeneity bias. We extend this research by using an older sample of U.S. individuals from the PSID. This sample allows us to examine age-gender interactive effects. Through sibling-random and fixed effects models, we find that a one percent increase in a woman's body mass results in a .6 percentage point decrease in her family income and a .4 percentage point decrease in her occupational prestige measured 13 to 15 years later. Body mass is also associated with a reduction in a woman's likelihood of marriage, her spouse's occupational prestige, and her spouse's earnings. However, consistent with past research, men experience no negative effects of body mass on economic outcomes. Age splits show that it is among younger adults where BMI effects are most robust, lending support to the interpretation that it is BMI causing occupational outcomes and not the reverse.

Suggested Citation

Conley, Dalton and Glauber, Rebecca, Gender, Body Mass and Economic Status (May 2005). NBER Working Paper No. w11343, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=727123

Dalton Conley (Contact Author)

New York University (NYU) - Department of Sociology ( email )

New York, NY 10012
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Rebecca Glauber

New York University - Center for Advanced Social Science Research ( email )

New York, NY 10012
United States

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
101
Abstract Views
1,374
rank
316,887
PlumX Metrics