Chinese and American Arbitrators: Examining the Effects of Attributions and Culture on Award Decisions

34 Pages Posted: 24 May 2005

See all articles by Ray Friedman

Ray Friedman

Vanderbilt University - Organizational Behavior

Wu Liu

Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Chao C. Chen

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey - Management & Global Business

Shu-Cheng Chi

National Taiwan University - Department of Business Administration

Date Written: June 1, 2005

Abstract

Most arbitration research has been conducted in United States, despite the growth of arbitration internationally. In this study, we examine differences between Chinese and Americans arbitrators. First, we examine general levels of leniency versus punishment when arbitrators make awards. We predict, and find, that Chinese arbitrators punish bad performance more heavily than do American arbitrators. Second, we examine the effects of attributions on awards. Prior theory suggests that Chinese tend to have more external attributions for events, which should make Chinese arbitrators more lenient than American arbitrators. We find the opposite - that Chinese arbitrators have more internal attributions for poor performance than do Americans. Moreover, where evidence is mixed (evidence is provided for both internal and external attributions), American arbitrators pay more attention to external causes, while Chinese arbitrators pay more attention to internal causes.

Keywords: Arbitration, attribution, cross-cultural,Chinese,cognition

Suggested Citation

Friedman, Raymond A. and Liu, Wu and Chen, Chao C. and Chi, Shu-Cheng, Chinese and American Arbitrators: Examining the Effects of Attributions and Culture on Award Decisions (June 1, 2005). IACM 18th Annual Conference, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=728441 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.728441

Raymond A. Friedman (Contact Author)

Vanderbilt University - Organizational Behavior ( email )

401 21st Avenue South
Nashville, TN 37203
United States
615-322-3992 (Phone)
615-343-7177 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://mba.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/rfriedman.cfm

Wu Liu

Hong Kong Polytechnic University ( email )

Hung Hom Kowloon
Hong Kong

Chao C. Chen

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey - Management & Global Business ( email )

Newark, NJ
United States
973-353-5425 (Phone)
973-353-1664 (Fax)

Shu-Cheng Chi

National Taiwan University - Department of Business Administration ( email )

No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd.
Taipei
Taiwan
+886 2 236 3 0231 Ext. 2942 (Phone)
+886 2 236 8 9305 (Fax)

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