When the Saints Go Marching In: Legal Consciousness and Prison Experiences of Conscientious Objectors to Military Service in Israel

THE NEW CIVIL RIGHTS RESEARCH, Laura-Beth Nielsen and Ben Fleury-Steiner, eds., Dartmouth: Ashgate, 2005

31 Pages Posted: 25 May 2005  

Hadar Aviram

University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Abstract

Legal consciousness literature has, in recent years, highlighted the significance law holds for people in everyday life. This paper questions the universality of law's relevance by portraying the way in which convicted conscientious objectors to military service in Israel viewed their trial and their prison experiences. Based on in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 15 conscientious objectors, the paper shows that they elect to exit the legal framework for perceiving their trial and sentence, and opt instead to view the entire experience through extra-legal prisms: as a game, an experiment and an experience. Based on these findings, the paper offers a broadened framework for legal consciousness research.

Keywords: Comparative law, legal consciousness, penology, criminology, conscientious objection, military law, prisons

Suggested Citation

Aviram, Hadar, When the Saints Go Marching In: Legal Consciousness and Prison Experiences of Conscientious Objectors to Military Service in Israel. THE NEW CIVIL RIGHTS RESEARCH, Laura-Beth Nielsen and Ben Fleury-Steiner, eds., Dartmouth: Ashgate, 2005. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=728745

Hadar Aviram (Contact Author)

University of California, Hastings College of the Law ( email )

200 McAllister Street
San Francisco, CA 94102
United States

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