The Great Depression and the New Deal

Chapter 8 in THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF LAW IN AMERICA, Vol. 3: The Twentieth Century and After (1920–), Grossberg and Tomlins, eds., 2008

Notre Dame Legal Studies Paper No. 1312

53 Pages Posted: 14 Jul 2005 Last revised: 30 Apr 2013

Barry Cushman

Notre Dame Law School

Date Written: November 1, 2008

Abstract

This essay was written for the Cambridge History of Law in America. Part I describes the economic conditions of the Great Depression and details the executive and legislative responses produced under the Hoover and Roosevelt Administrations. Part II examines contemporary controversies over the growth of federal executive authority and the elaboration of the administrative state. Part III documents the relaxation of constraints on economic regulation imposed by the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments and the Contract Clause. Part IV analyzes various manifestations of the revolution in constitutional federalism. Part V explores the growth of protections for civil rights, civil liberties, and democratic processes.

Keywords: Great Depression, New Deal, legal history, constitutional history

Suggested Citation

Cushman, Barry, The Great Depression and the New Deal (November 1, 2008). Chapter 8 in THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF LAW IN AMERICA, Vol. 3: The Twentieth Century and After (1920–), Grossberg and Tomlins, eds., 2008; Notre Dame Legal Studies Paper No. 1312. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=754231

Barry Cushman (Contact Author)

Notre Dame Law School ( email )

P.O. Box 780
Notre Dame, IN 46556-0780
United States

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