Law and Legal Theory in the Western Tradition

The Encyclopedia of Christianity (Grand Rapids/Leiden: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company/E.J. Brill, 2004), vol. 3, 219-226.

12 Pages Posted: 15 Jul 2005  

John Witte Jr.

Emory University School of Law

Abstract

This Article provides a brief analysis of the main shifts in Western law and legal theory in four watershed periods: (1) the Christianization of Rome and Romanization of Christianity in the fourth and fifth centuries; (2) the Papal Revolution of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries; (3) the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century; and (4) the Enlightenment of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. It shows how major shifts in dominant religious ideas transformed the legal ideas and institutions of their day. It concludes that, although recent secular movements have removed traditional forms of religious influence on Western law, contemporary Western law still retains important connections with Christian and other religious ideas and institutions.

Keywords: legal theory, Western law, Christian

Suggested Citation

Witte, John, Law and Legal Theory in the Western Tradition. The Encyclopedia of Christianity (Grand Rapids/Leiden: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company/E.J. Brill, 2004), vol. 3, 219-226.. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=755086

John Witte Jr. (Contact Author)

Emory University School of Law ( email )

1301 Clifton Road
Atlanta, GA 30322
United States
404-727-6980 (Phone)
404-712-8605 (Fax)

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