Searching for the Economic Gradient in Self-Assessed Health

41 Pages Posted: 22 Sep 2005

See all articles by Michael Lokshin

Michael Lokshin

World Bank - Development Research Group (DECRG); National Research University Higher School of Economics

Martin Ravallion

Georgetown University

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: September 2005

Abstract

Can self-assessed health (SAH) be relied upon to identify the true socioeconomic gradients in health status? The self-assessed health of Russian adults in 2002 shows remarkably little gradient with respect to economic welfare. We document this finding and assess its robustness to the assumptions routinely made in measuring health and welfare. We find that the expected economic gradient only emerges once one focuses on the component of SAH that is explicable in terms of age and more objective health indicators and one allows for broader dimensions of economic welfare than captured by standard income-based measures. Our results point to the need for caution in analyzing and interpreting SAH data.

Keywords: Self-assessed health, economic welfare, gradient, Russia

JEL Classification: D63, I12, I31

Suggested Citation

Lokshin, Michael and Ravallion, Martin, Searching for the Economic Gradient in Self-Assessed Health (September 2005). World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 3698. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=802904 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.802904

Michael Lokshin (Contact Author)

World Bank - Development Research Group (DECRG) ( email )

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HOME PAGE: http://econ.worldbank.org/staff/mlokshin

National Research University Higher School of Economics

Myasnitskaya street, 20
Moscow, Moscow 119017
Russia

Martin Ravallion

Georgetown University ( email )

Washington, DC 20057
United States

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