Katrina's Continuing Impact on Procurement - Emergency Procurement Powers in H.R. 3766

Government Contractor, Vol. 47, No. 35, par. 397, September 21, 2005

GWU Law School Public Law Research Paper No. 162

GWU Legal Studies Research Paper No. 162

7 Pages Posted: 27 Sep 2005 Last revised: 31 May 2012

Christopher R. Yukins

George Washington University - Law School

Joshua I. Schwartz

The George Washington University Law School

Date Written: 2005

Abstract

As Hurricane Katrina relief efforts grow into the billions of dollars, the U.S. Congress is considering additional legislation to liberalize procurement, including H.R. 3766, co-sponsored by Representatives Kenny Marchant and Tom Davis. In these comments on the proposed legislation, Professors Christopher Yukins and Joshua Schwartz asked whether the proposed changes, which would eviscerate competition for most procurement related to disaster relief, are truly necessary. Professor Yukins suggests that, though it might in some circumstances be necessary to dismantle the federal regulatory regime to accommodate a wave of new firms in the federal market, there is too little evidence yet to support such radical measures. Professor Schwartz argues that there is no basis, empirically or analytically, for any effort to undo the careful protections afforded by the federal procurement system.

Keywords: public procurement, emergency procurement, federal procurement policy

Suggested Citation

Yukins, Christopher R. and Schwartz, Joshua I., Katrina's Continuing Impact on Procurement - Emergency Procurement Powers in H.R. 3766 (2005). Government Contractor, Vol. 47, No. 35, par. 397, September 21, 2005; GWU Law School Public Law Research Paper No. 162; GWU Legal Studies Research Paper No. 162. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=811265

Christopher R. Yukins (Contact Author)

George Washington University - Law School ( email )

2000 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20052
United States
202-994-9992 (Phone)

Joshua I. Schwartz

The George Washington University Law School ( email )

2000 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20052
United States

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