The Male Marital Wage Differential: Race, Training, and Fixed Effects

47 Pages Posted: 15 Oct 2005

See all articles by Leslie S. Stratton

Leslie S. Stratton

Virginia Commonwealth University - School of Business - Department of Economics; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

William M. Rodgers III

Rutgers University

Date Written: September 2005

Abstract

Married white men have higher wages and faster wage growth than unmarried white men. Using the NLSY, we examine whether racial differences in intrahousehold specialization and formal training explain married men's faster wage growth, and individual-specific data on cognitive skills, family background, and self-esteem contribute to married men's higher wages. African American households engage in less intrahousehold specialization and experience no differential wage growth - a finding consistent with an intrahousehold specialization argument. However, while married men have more training, cognitive ability, and self-esteem than unmarried men, controlling for these differences does not explain any component of the marital wage differential.

Keywords: wages, marriage, race, training, fixed effects

JEL Classification: J31, J12

Suggested Citation

Stratton, Leslie S. and Rodgers III, William M., The Male Marital Wage Differential: Race, Training, and Fixed Effects (September 2005). IZA Discussion Paper No. 1745, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=822305

Leslie S. Stratton (Contact Author)

Virginia Commonwealth University - School of Business - Department of Economics ( email )

Box 844000
Richmond, VA 23284-4000
United States
804-828-7141 (Phone)
804-828-1719 (Fax)

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

William M. Rodgers III

Rutgers University ( email )

Piscataway, NJ 08854
United States

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