Japan's New Arbitration Law: Domestication Reinforcing Internationalisation?

International Arbitration Law Review, Vol. 7, pp. 54-60, 2004

7 Pages Posted: 7 Nov 2005

See all articles by Luke R. Nottage

Luke R. Nottage

The University of Sydney Law School; The University of Sydney - Australian Network for Japanese Law

Abstract

More than some general cultural aversion, disinterest on the part of the government and an array of structural disincentives facing parties and arbitrators best explain the low uptake of arbitration services within Japan. The Arbitration Act of 2003 signals a shift, aimed primarily at expanding ADR for domestic users as part of Japan's wide-ranging reforms to civil justice initiated since 2001, but which may also reinforce slow but steady internationalisation of arbitration in Japan.

Keywords: japan, arbitration, civil dispute resolution

JEL Classification: K41

Suggested Citation

Nottage, Luke R., Japan's New Arbitration Law: Domestication Reinforcing Internationalisation?. International Arbitration Law Review, Vol. 7, pp. 54-60, 2004. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=838025

Luke R. Nottage (Contact Author)

The University of Sydney Law School ( email )

New Law Building, F10
The University of Sydney
Sydney, NSW 2006
Australia

The University of Sydney - Australian Network for Japanese Law

Room 640, Building F10, Eastern Avenue
Sydney, NSW 2006
Australia

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