Child Growth, Shocks, and Food Aid in Rural Ethiopia

Posted: 15 Dec 2005

See all articles by Takashi Yamano

Takashi Yamano

World Bank - Africa Region; Michigan State University - Department of Agricultural Economics

Harold Alderman

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

Luc Christiaensen

World Bank

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Abstract

Child stunting in Ethiopia has persisted at alarming rates, despite enormous amounts of food aid, often procured in response to shocks. Using nationally representative data, the study finds that while harvest failure leads to child growth faltering, food aid affected child growth positively and offset the negative effects of shocks in communities that received food aid. However, many communities that experienced shocks did not receive food aid. In sum, while food aid has helped reduce child malnutrition, inflexible food aid targeting, together with endemic poverty and limited maternal education, has left the prevalence of child stunting at alarming levels.

Suggested Citation

Yamano, Takashi and Alderman, Harold and Christiaensen, Luc, Child Growth, Shocks, and Food Aid in Rural Ethiopia. American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Vol. 87, No. 2, pp. 273-288, May 2005. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=856491 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8276.2005.00721.x

Takashi Yamano

World Bank - Africa Region ( email )

1818 H Street
Washington, DC 20433
United States

Michigan State University - Department of Agricultural Economics ( email )

East Lansing, MI 48824
United States

Harold Alderman (Contact Author)

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) ( email )

1201 Eye St, NW,
Washington, DC 20005
United States

Luc Christiaensen

World Bank ( email )

1818 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20433
United States

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