Who Gets Over the Training Hurdle?: A Study of the Training Experiences of Young Men and Women in Britain

JOURNAL OF POPULATION ECONOMICS, Vol. 10, 1997

Posted: 18 Jun 1997

See all articles by Wiji Arulampalam

Wiji Arulampalam

University of Warwick - Department of Economics; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Alison L. Booth

Australian National University (ANU) - Research School of Social Sciences (RSSS); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); IZA Institute of Labor Economics

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Abstract

Using longitudinal data from the British National Child Development Study, this paper examines gender differences in the determinants of work-related training. The analysis covers a crucial decade in the working lives of the 1958 birth cohort of young men and women--the years spanning the ages 23 to 33. Hurdle negative binomial models are used to estimate the number of work-related training events lasting at least three days. This approach takes into account the fact that more than one-half of the men and two-thirds of the women in the sample experienced no work-related training lasting three or more days over the period 1981-91. Our analysis suggests that reliance on work-related training to improve the skills of the work-force will result in an increase in the skills of the already educated but will not improve the skills of individuals entering the labor market with relatively low levels of education.

JEL Classification: C25, I21, J24

Suggested Citation

Arulampalam, Wiji and Booth, Alison L., Who Gets Over the Training Hurdle?: A Study of the Training Experiences of Young Men and Women in Britain. JOURNAL OF POPULATION ECONOMICS, Vol. 10, 1997, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=8582

Wiji Arulampalam (Contact Author)

University of Warwick - Department of Economics ( email )

Coventry CV4 7AL
United Kingdom
01203 523471 (Phone)
01203 523032 (Fax)

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Alison L. Booth

Australian National University (ANU) - Research School of Social Sciences (RSSS) ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200
Australia
+61 2 6125 3285 (Phone)
+61 2 6125 0182 (Fax)

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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