When Does Culture Matter? Effects of Personal Knowledge on the Correction of Culture-Based Judgments

Journal of Marketing Research, 2006

45 Pages Posted: 23 Jan 2006

See all articles by Donnel A. Briley

Donnel A. Briley

University of Sydney

Jennifer Aaker

Stanford University - Graduate School of Business

Abstract

Four experiments demonstrate that culture-based differences in persuasion arise when information is processed in a cursory, spontaneous manner, but dissipate when one's intuitions are supplemented by more deliberative processing. North Americans are more persuaded by promotion-focused information, and Chinese individuals are more persuaded by prevention - focused information - but only when initial, automatic reactions to messages are given. Corrections to these default judgments occur when processing is thoughtful. These results underscore the idea that culture does not exert a constant, unwavering effect on consumer judgments. One key factor in determining whether culture-based effects loom large or fade is the extent to which cultural versus more personal knowledge is drawn upon when forming judgments.

Keywords: culture, regulatory focus, promotion, prevention, decision making

JEL Classification: M31, M37

Suggested Citation

Briley, Donnel A. and Aaker, Jennifer Lynn, When Does Culture Matter? Effects of Personal Knowledge on the Correction of Culture-Based Judgments. Journal of Marketing Research, 2006. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=877705

Donnel A. Briley (Contact Author)

University of Sydney ( email )

University of Sydney
Sydney NSW 2006, NC
Australia

Jennifer Lynn Aaker

Stanford University - Graduate School of Business ( email )

655 Knight Way
Stanford, CA 94305-5015
United States

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