Environmental Investment and Policy with Distortionary Taxes and Endogenous Growth

28 Pages Posted: 10 May 2006 Last revised: 24 Oct 2015

See all articles by Don Fullerton

Don Fullerton

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - Department of Finance; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute)

Seung-Rae Kim

Korea Institute of Public Finance

Date Written: March 2006

Abstract

Recent studies consider public R&D spending that affects abatement knowledge and endogenous growth, distortionary taxes that affect physical and human capital formation, pollution taxes that affect environmental degradation, and regeneration that restores natural capital. Our model combines all of those elements. We show how the combination affects results from each prior model, focusing on two parameters that represent the need for distorting taxes, and the productivity of abatement knowledge relative to pollution. First, either of these two extensions can reverse the prior finding that pollution tax revenue is more than enough to pay for public abatement R&D. Second, tax distortions and externalities substantially alter prior findings that the ratio of public to private capital is based only on output elasticities. Third, our dynamic model affects prior static findings about how other public spending "crowds out" provision of the environmental public good. Fourth, we show whether a greater need for public spending leads to greater increases in the distorting tax or pollution tax. Fifth, while prior research is optimistic that environmental regulation can boost economic growth, we show how it may increase or decrease the growth rate --even if it raises welfare.

Suggested Citation

Fullerton, Don and Kim, Seung-Rae, Environmental Investment and Policy with Distortionary Taxes and Endogenous Growth (March 2006). NBER Working Paper No. w12070. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=888272

Don Fullerton (Contact Author)

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - Department of Finance ( email )

1206 South Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
United States
(217) 244-3621 (Phone)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute)

Poschinger Str. 5
Munich, DE-81679
Germany

Seung-Rae Kim

Korea Institute of Public Finance ( email )

79-6 Garak-Dong, Songpa-Ku
Seoul
Korea

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