The Jury Persuaded (and Not): Computer Animation in the Courtroom

21 Pages Posted: 8 May 2006

See all articles by Meghan A. Dunn

Meghan A. Dunn

Government of the United States of America - Federal Judicial Center

Neal Feigenson

Quinnipiac University - School of Law

Peter Salovey

Yale University - Institution for Social and Policy Studies

Abstract

In two experiments, we examined the persuasiveness of computer animation on juror decision making by comparing animation to diagrams in two mock trials - a plane crash case and a car accident case. The persuasiveness of the animation on verdicts was dependent on the case; in the plane crash case, participants rendered verdicts in favor of the side presenting the animation. In the car accident case, the animation had no effect on verdicts. The role of familiarity with the depicted scenario is discussed as a possible explanation for the differing impact of animation. Additionally, jurors' expectations about the persuasiveness of animations were discrepant with the animations' actual influence on jurors' verdicts.

Suggested Citation

Dunn, Meghan A. and Feigenson, Neal and Salovey, Peter, The Jury Persuaded (and Not): Computer Animation in the Courtroom. Law & Policy, Vol. 28, No. 2, pp. 228-248, April 2006. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=889150 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9930.2006.00225.x

Meghan A. Dunn (Contact Author)

Government of the United States of America - Federal Judicial Center ( email )

Washington, DC 20002
United States

Neal Feigenson

Quinnipiac University - School of Law ( email )

275 Mt. Carmel Ave.
Hamden, CT 06518
United States

Peter Salovey

Yale University - Institution for Social and Policy Studies ( email )

89 Trumbull Street
New Haven, CT 06515
United States

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