Federal Program Expenditures for Working-Age People with Disabilities: Research Report

Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Forthcoming

Posted: 28 Mar 2006  

Nanette J. Goodman

Independent Consultant

David C. Stapleton

Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.

Abstract

Public assistance programs are important sources of support for working-age people with disabilities in the United States. Using a variety of information sources, the authors estimate that the federal government spent $226 billion in 2002 on working-age people with disabilities, including both cash and in-kind benefits. These expenditures account for about 2.2 percent of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP) and 11.3 percent of all federal outlays. States contributed an additional $50 billion under federal-state programs. The bulk of these expenditures provided income support and health care to working-age people with disabilities who were not employed or had very low earnings. The authors provide a detailed accounting of the expenditures and question whether the distribution of expenditures is properly aligned with the evolving disability paradigm.

Suggested Citation

Goodman, Nanette J. and Stapleton, David C., Federal Program Expenditures for Working-Age People with Disabilities: Research Report. Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=892331

Nanette J. Goodman (Contact Author)

Independent Consultant ( email )

16512 Kipling Rd
Derwood, MD 20855
United States

David C. Stapleton

Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. ( email )

1100 1st St NE
12th Floor
Washington, DC 20002-4221
United States
202-484-9220 (Phone)

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