The Use of Foreign Decisions by Federal Courts: An Empirical Analysis

35 Pages Posted: 27 Apr 2006 Last revised: 4 Jul 2013

David T. Zaring

University of Pennsylvania - Legal Studies Department

Date Written: 2006

Abstract

This article adds an empirical perspective to the debate over the use of foreign authority by federal courts. It surveys sixty years of federal court practice in citing opinions from foreign high courts, through a citation count analysis. The data reveals that federal courts rarely cite to foreign decisions, they do so no more now than they did in the past, and on those few occasions where they do cite to foreign decisions, it's usually not to help them interpret domestic law. Instead the citation of foreign decisions is best understood as a relatively rare phenomenon of judicial dialogue in cases where international issues are squarely presented by the facts. The article examines those few cases where federal courts have cited foreign decisions in some detail, and briefly considers some implications of the limited use of foreign decisions by federal courts.

Suggested Citation

Zaring, David T., The Use of Foreign Decisions by Federal Courts: An Empirical Analysis (2006). Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, July 2006; Washington & Lee Legal Studies Paper No. 2006-04. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=899148

David T. Zaring (Contact Author)

University of Pennsylvania - Legal Studies Department ( email )

3730 Walnut Street
Suite 600
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6365
United States

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