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Getting Personal About Electronic Health Records: Modeling the Beliefs of Personal Health Record Users and Non-Users

30 Pages Posted: 17 May 2006  

Corey M. Angst

University of Notre Dame

Ritu Agarwal

University of Maryland - Robert H. Smith School of Business

Date Written: May 2006

Abstract

Although the impact that information technology can have on the delivery of health care is widely acknowledged, surprisingly, empirical investigation of this impact has been limited. One explanation for the paucity of rigorous studies is that practitioners and scholars alike, struggle with the fact that health information technology (HIT) is diffusing at a relatively slow rate compared to other industries, and thus there are limited avenues for pursuing this type of investigation. In this paper we draw on theories of cognition and use a large data set collected from a nationwide telephone survey to examine the acceptance of HIT. The specific technology examined is the personal health record (PHR). We argue that individuals will engage in a sensemaking process and develop cognitive schemas about electronic PHRs based on factors describing their health situations and technological sophistication. Using factor analysis and structural equation modeling, we first derive the cognitive schema and then test for its effects on the user's willingness to store health information electronically. Results support the proposed conceptualization and yield important implications for future research and practice.

Keywords: Electronic Health Record, EHR, Personal Health Record, PHR, Health Information Technology, HIT, Cognitive Schema, Mental Model

Suggested Citation

Angst, Corey M. and Agarwal, Ritu, Getting Personal About Electronic Health Records: Modeling the Beliefs of Personal Health Record Users and Non-Users (May 2006). Robert H. Smith School Research Paper No. RHS-06-007. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=902904 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.902904

Corey M. Angst (Contact Author)

University of Notre Dame ( email )

361 Mendoza College of Business
Notre Dame, IN New South Wales 46556-5646
United States

Ritu Agarwal

University of Maryland - Robert H. Smith School of Business ( email )

College Park, MD 20742-1815
United States

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