Corporate Social Accountability Standards in the Global Supply Chain: Resistance, Reconsideration and Resolution in China

51 Pages Posted: 13 Jul 2006 Last revised: 30 Oct 2011

See all articles by Li-Wen Lin

Li-Wen Lin

University of British Columbia (UBC), Faculty of Law

Date Written: July 1, 2006

Abstract

This Article provides a view on corporate social accountability standards from a Chinese perspective, a slightly different angle from that of legal scholars in the United States. The legal literature in the United States typically only focuses on the importance and effectiveness of corporate social accountability standards to regulate the conduct of multinational companies in the era of globalization. However, the views of the outsourced companies in the developing countries on which the multinational companies impose the standards have seldom received attention. This Article tries to fill this void by examining the situation in China. As shown in this Article, effective implementation of corporate social accountability standards requires a refined approach that considers local circumstances in developing countries.

Keywords: corporate social responsibility, corporate codes of conduct, SA 8000, protectionism, bargaining power

Suggested Citation

Lin, Li-Wen, Corporate Social Accountability Standards in the Global Supply Chain: Resistance, Reconsideration and Resolution in China (July 1, 2006). Cardozo Journal of International and Comparative Law (JICL), Vol. 15, No. 2, p. 321, Fall 2007; U Illinois Law & Economics Research Paper No. LE06-018. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=916929 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.916929

Li-Wen Lin (Contact Author)

University of British Columbia (UBC), Faculty of Law ( email )

1822 East Mall
Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1
Canada

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