A Very Special Place in Life: The History of Juvenile Justice in Missouri

Douglas Abrams, A VERY SPECIAL PLACE IN LIFE: THE HISTORY OF JUVENILE JUSTICE IN MISSOURI, Missouri Juvenile Justice Association, 2003

12 Pages Posted: 27 Jul 2006 Last revised: 23 Aug 2012

See all articles by Douglas E. Abrams

Douglas E. Abrams

University of Missouri School of Law

Abstract

The leaders were dedicated reformers - the "child savers" - who sought to remove children from poorhouses, prisons and other harsh institutions that left little hope for productive adulthood.

A Very Special Place in Life traces the twentieth century growth of Missouri's juvenile courts. It discusses the profound changes wrought by the United States Supreme Court's Gault decision, which triggered the "due process revolution" in the nation's juvenile courts in 1967. The book examines efforts to reduce disparities between services available to rural and metropolitan children, and between treatment of minority children and others.

By the early 1980s, Missouri began winning national recognition in juvenile justice. When the state replaced its deteriorating reformatories with small regional facilities stressing treatment and therapy, the new approach to delinquency won national acclaim as "a guiding light for reform."

Suggested Citation

Abrams, Douglas E., A Very Special Place in Life: The History of Juvenile Justice in Missouri. Douglas Abrams, A VERY SPECIAL PLACE IN LIFE: THE HISTORY OF JUVENILE JUSTICE IN MISSOURI, Missouri Juvenile Justice Association, 2003. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=920704

Douglas E. Abrams (Contact Author)

University of Missouri School of Law ( email )

Missouri Avenue & Conley Avenue
Columbia, MO MO 65211
United States
573-882-0307 (Phone)

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
103
rank
254,149
Abstract Views
1,488
PlumX Metrics