What's in a Name? The Economics, Law and Politics of Geographical Indications for Foods and Beverages

33 Pages Posted: 8 Aug 2006

See all articles by Timothy E. Josling

Timothy E. Josling

Stanford University - The European Forum, Institute for International Studies

Date Written: January 2006

Abstract

Romeo may indeed have believed that a rose by any other name would smell as sweet, but would a feta cheese by any other name sell as well in the supermarket? Producers from a particular region who have acquired a reputation for quality, and see others cashing in on that reputation, clearly think that there it is well worth seeking protection for their names. Should this be a universal phenomenon? Or is it limited to a few wines and cheeses produced by European farmers? In the brave new world of global markets and multilateral food regulations the framework for the treatment of such geographical indications (GIs) is still under construction. And the decisions chosen could have significant impacts on farmers and consumers in all countries.

Suggested Citation

Josling, Timothy E., What's in a Name? The Economics, Law and Politics of Geographical Indications for Foods and Beverages (January 2006). IIIS Discussion Paper No. 109. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=922267 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.922267

Timothy E. Josling (Contact Author)

Stanford University - The European Forum, Institute for International Studies ( email )

Encina Hall C100
616 Serra Street
Stanford, CA 94305
United States
650-723-3438 (Phone)
650-723-4811 (Fax)

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
543
Abstract Views
1,986
rank
51,955
PlumX Metrics