Social Interactions in Adolescent Television Viewing

Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 160, No. 4, 2006

4 Pages Posted: 31 Aug 2006 Last revised: 2 Sep 2008

See all articles by Jason M. Fletcher

Jason M. Fletcher

University of Wisconsin - Madison - Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs; Yale University - School of Public Health

Abstract

Objective To examine whether social interactions influence the television viewing choices of adolescents in grades 7 through 12.

Design Data from a nationally representative cross-sectional survey were used to examine the association between individual-level and school-level television choices. An instrumental variables approach was used to solve the simultaneity problem found in models that examine the association between individual and aggregate choices. In-home interviews in the United States collected in 1996.

A sample of 4532 students in grades 7 through 12 in 132 US public and private schools who participated in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). The reported television viewing choices of an individual's schoolmates. The number of hours of television individuals reported viewing in a week.

The number of hours of television that adolescents report viewing per week was associated with their peers' reported hours of television viewing. Adjusted for other covariates, a 1-hour increase in average school-level television viewing was associated with an increase in almost half an hour of television viewing at the individual level.

Evidence suggests that social interactions within schools influence the hours of television that adolescents report viewing. This finding is important for both future attempts at modeling the determinants of adolescent television viewing and suggestions for future policy interventions. The presence of social interactions implies that interventions that affect the social norms of television viewing within schools could also change individual television viewing. In reducing the number of hours of television watched, these interventions could also positively affect adolescent obesity, emotional problems, and academic achievement.

Keywords: Social Interactions, Television, Media Use, Social Influences

Suggested Citation

Fletcher, Jason M., Social Interactions in Adolescent Television Viewing. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 160, No. 4, 2006. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=927556

Jason M. Fletcher (Contact Author)

University of Wisconsin - Madison - Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs ( email )

1180 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706-1393
United States

Yale University - School of Public Health ( email )

PO Box 208034
60 College Street
New Haven, CT 06520-8034
United States

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