Supporting Children, Balancing Lives

34 Pepperdine Law Review 359 (2007)

44 Pages Posted: 17 Sep 2006 Last revised: 22 Apr 2017

See all articles by Katharine K. Baker

Katharine K. Baker

Chicago-Kent College of Law - Illinois Institute of Technology

Date Written: 2007

Abstract

This paper examines how U.S. child support policy validates traditional divisions of labor and thereby hinders individual attempts to achieve an acceptable work/family balance. It argues that by using the household as the relevant unit of measurement for child support purposes, family law doctrine legitimates the specialization contracts that arise within households. These specialization contracts, used most extensively in wealthy, elite households, undermine attempts to distribute caretaking and provider roles more equally between parents. The article suggest that by dispensing with the household as the relevant unit of measurement and treating all parents individually, each with a responsibility to caretake and provide, the law could transform parental arrangements at the elite level, which would likely have significant positive repercussions for non-elite parents as well.

Keywords: child support, family, family law, work/family

Suggested Citation

Baker, Katharine K., Supporting Children, Balancing Lives (2007). 34 Pepperdine Law Review 359 (2007), Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=930511

Katharine K. Baker (Contact Author)

Chicago-Kent College of Law - Illinois Institute of Technology ( email )

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