Cramming: The Effects of School Accountability on College-Bound Students

37 Pages Posted: 20 Nov 2006 Last revised: 2 Jan 2023

See all articles by Colleen Donovan

Colleen Donovan

Freddie Mac

David N. Figlio

Northwestern University; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Mark Rush

University of Florida - Warrington College of Business Administration - Department of Economics

Date Written: October 2006

Abstract

This paper is the first to explore the effects of school accountability systems on high-achieving students' long-term performance. Using exceptional data from a large highly-selective state university, we relate school accountability pressure in high school to a student's university-level grades and study habits. We exploit a change in the state's accountability system in 1999 that led to some schools becoming newlythreatened by accountability pressure and others becoming newly-unthreatened to identify the effects of accountability pressure. We find that an accountability system based on a low-level test of basic skills apparently led to generally reduced performance by high-achieving students, while an accountability system based on a more challenging criterion-referenced exam apparently led to improved performance in college on mathematics and other technical subjects. Both types of systems are associated with increased "cramming" by students in college. The results indicate that the nature of an accountability system can influence its effectiveness.

Suggested Citation

Donovan, Colleen and Figlio, David N. and Rush, Mark, Cramming: The Effects of School Accountability on College-Bound Students (October 2006). NBER Working Paper No. w12628, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=938954

Colleen Donovan

Freddie Mac ( email )

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David N. Figlio (Contact Author)

Northwestern University ( email )

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National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Mark Rush

University of Florida - Warrington College of Business Administration - Department of Economics ( email )

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