Can Mixed Emotions Peacefully Coexist?

15 Pages Posted: 17 Nov 2006

See all articles by Patti Williams

Patti Williams

University of Pennsylvania - The Wharton School

Jennifer Aaker

Stanford University - Graduate School of Business

Date Written: June 2000

Abstract

This research sheds insight on the psychological impact of mixed emotions on attitudes. In three experiments, we show that persuasion appeals that highlight conflicting emotions (e.g. both happiness and sadness) lead to less favorable attitudes for individuals with a lower propensity to accept duality (e.g. Anglo Americans, younger adults) relative to those with a higher propensity (e.g., Asian Americans, older adults). The effect appears to be due to increased levels of felt discomfort that arise for those with a lower, but not higher, propensity to accept duality when exposed to mixed emotional appeals. Theoretical implications regarding boundary conditions of emotional dissonance and distinctions between emotional and cognitive dissonance are discussed.

Suggested Citation

Williams, Patti and Aaker, Jennifer Lynn, Can Mixed Emotions Peacefully Coexist? (June 2000). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=945468 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.945468

Patti Williams

University of Pennsylvania - The Wharton School ( email )

Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States

Jennifer Lynn Aaker (Contact Author)

Stanford University - Graduate School of Business ( email )

655 Knight Way
Stanford, CA 94305-5015
United States

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