The Interpersonal Implications of Stealing the Glory

35 Pages Posted: 21 Nov 2006

See all articles by Jeremy Burrus

Jeremy Burrus

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - Department of Psychology

Justin Kruger

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; New York University (NYU); New York University (NYU) - Department of Marketing

Kenneth Savitsky

Williams College - Department of Psychology

Date Written: September 1, 2006

Abstract

People tend to overestimate their contribution to joint tasks, in part because their own contributions are more memorable than the contributions of their collaborators. We examined some of the interpersonal consequences of this bias. Participants engaged in either a hypothetical (Experiment 2) or real (Experiment 1) cooperative task and learned how their collaborator ostensibly allocated responsibility. We varied how much credit the collaborator took for herself, and also how much credit she gave to the participant, factors confounded in past research. In each experiment, collaborators who stole the glory were seen as less fair, harder to get along with, and less honest than were collaborators who did not. Interestingly, this effect was driven by one's own contribution being underappreciated more than one's collaborator's contribution being overstated. Mediational analyses revealed that the discord could be traced to the attribution of biased responsibility judgments to self-interest on the part of one's collaborator.

Keywords: responsibility, egocentrism, social comparison, social judgment, naive

Suggested Citation

Burrus, Jeremy and Kruger, Justin and Savitsky, Kenneth, The Interpersonal Implications of Stealing the Glory (September 1, 2006). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=946191 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.946191

Jeremy Burrus (Contact Author)

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - Department of Psychology ( email )

601 E John St
Champaign, IL 61820
United States

Justin Kruger

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ( email )

601 E John St
Champaign, IL 61820
United States

New York University (NYU) ( email )

Bobst Library, E-resource Acquisitions
20 Cooper Square 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10003-711
United States

New York University (NYU) - Department of Marketing ( email )

Henry Kaufman Ctr
44 W 4 St.
New York, NY
United States

Kenneth Savitsky

Williams College - Department of Psychology ( email )

Williamstown, MA 01267
United States

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