The Suitability of Computer-Based Training for Workers with Limited Formal Education: A Case Study from the Us Agricultural Sector

16 Pages Posted: 24 Nov 2006

See all articles by W. Kent Anger

W. Kent Anger

Oregon Health & Science University

Jeff Stupfel

Oregon Health & Science University

Tammara Ammerman

Oregon Health & Science University

Alys Tamulinas

Oregon Health & Science University

Todd Bodner

Portland State University - Department of Psychology

Diane S. Rohlman

Oregon Health & Science University

Abstract

The suitability of computer-based instruction (CBI) for workers with limited education was evaluated in an Hispanic orchard workforce that reported little computer experience and 5.6 mean years of formal education. Ladder safety training was completed by employees who rated the training highly (effect size [d_gain]=5.68), and their knowledge of ladder safety improved (d_gain=1.45). There was a significant increase (p<0.01) in safe work practices immediately after training (d_gain=0.70), at 40 days post training (d_gain=0.87) and at 60 days (d_gain=1.40), indicating durability. As in mainstream populations, reaction or affective ratings correlated well with utility ratings, but not with behavior change. This demonstrates that an agricultural workforce with limited formal education can learn job safety from CBI and translate the knowledge to work practice changes, and those changes are durable.

Suggested Citation

Anger, W. Kent and Stupfel, Jeff and Ammerman, Tammara and Tamulinas, Alys and Bodner, Todd E. and Rohlman, Diane S., The Suitability of Computer-Based Training for Workers with Limited Formal Education: A Case Study from the Us Agricultural Sector. International Journal of Training and Development, Vol. 10, No. 4, pp. 269-284, December 2006. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=947001 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2419.2006.00260.x

W. Kent Anger (Contact Author)

Oregon Health & Science University ( email )

Behavioral and Psychological Assessment Laboratory
Portland, OR 97201
United States
(503) 494-2514 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.ohsu.edu/croet/faculty/anger/

Jeff Stupfel

Oregon Health & Science University ( email )

Behavioral and Psychological Assessment Laboratory
Portland, OR 97201
United States
(503) 494-2514 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.ohsu.edu/croet/faculty/anger/behavioral.html

Tammara Ammerman

Oregon Health & Science University ( email )

Behavioral and Psychological Assessment Laboratory
Portland, OR 97201
United States
(503) 494-2514 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.ohsu.edu/croet/faculty/anger/behavioral.html

Alys Tamulinas

Oregon Health & Science University ( email )

Behavioral and Psychological Assessment Laboratory
Portland, OR 97201
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.ohsu.edu/croet/faculty/anger/behavioral.html

Todd E. Bodner

Portland State University - Department of Psychology ( email )

OR 97221
United States

Diane S. Rohlman

Oregon Health & Science University ( email )

Behavioral and Psychological Assessment Laboratory
Portland, OR 97201
United States
(503) 494-2514 (Phone)

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