When Duties Collide: Beneficence and Veracity in the Evaluation of Living Organ Donors

Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation, Vol. 12, No. 2, pp. 188-192, April 2007

Posted: 22 Dec 2006

See all articles by Mary Simmerling

Mary Simmerling

Adler University; Cornell University, Weill Cornell Medical College

Joel Frader

Northwestern University - Feinberg School of Medicine

John Franklin

Northwestern University - Feinberg School of Medicine

Peter Angelos

Northwestern University

Abstract

Purpose of review: Although the medical excuse is routinely used by many transplant programs, ethical issues arising from its use have received little critical attention. This review will: (1) define the medical excuse and briefly discuss its history, purposes, and use in the context of evaluating donor candidates, and (2) provide a framework for evaluating some of the ethical issues related to its use through consideration of and comparison with ethical issues arising from the use of deception in medical practice.

Recent Findings: No empirical evidence supports or contradicts claims about whether using the medical excuse in transplantation fosters the short- or long-term benefits or harms commonly attributed to it. The literature on using deception in medical practice provides illustrative comparisons and suggests the medical excuse may have ramifications not yet well understood.

Summary: The medical excuse is used by many transplant programs to assist or usher donor candidates out of donation. This review explores ethical issues that may arise from maintaining or abandoning this practice and suggests that it merits further empiric and analytic attention from the transplant community.

Keywords: Medical excuse, ethics, deception, truth-telling

Suggested Citation

Simmerling, Mary and Frader, Joel and Franklin, John and Angelos, Peter, When Duties Collide: Beneficence and Veracity in the Evaluation of Living Organ Donors. Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation, Vol. 12, No. 2, pp. 188-192, April 2007, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=953211

Mary Simmerling (Contact Author)

Adler University ( email )

17 N. Dearborn
Chicago, IL 60604
United States

Cornell University, Weill Cornell Medical College ( email )

1300 York Avenue
New York, NY 10065
United States

HOME PAGE: http://https://vivo.weill.cornell.edu/display/cwid-mcs2006

Joel Frader

Northwestern University - Feinberg School of Medicine ( email )

Chicago, IL 60611
United States

John Franklin

Northwestern University - Feinberg School of Medicine ( email )

Chicago, IL 60611
United States

Peter Angelos

Northwestern University ( email )

2001 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208
United States

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
870
PlumX Metrics