The De-Collectivisation of Pay Setting in Britain 1990-98: Incidence, Determinants and Impact

18 Pages Posted: 20 Jan 2007

See all articles by Andy Charlwood

Andy Charlwood

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Centre for Economic Performance (CEP); University of Leeds - Leeds University Business School (LUBS)

Abstract

What were the causes and consequences of declining collective bargaining coverage in Britain? The demise of collective bargaining did not lead to a greater use of individualised payment mechanisms, 'high-involvement' practices or productivity gains. Wage inequality rose as a result of the decline. However, workplaces that abandoned bargaining created more jobs. Overall, these results raise questions about Britain's labour market performance during the 1990s because they suggest that falling unemployment as a result of weaker trade unions came at the price of slower productivity growth and widening male wage inequality.

Suggested Citation

Charlwood, Andrew, The De-Collectivisation of Pay Setting in Britain 1990-98: Incidence, Determinants and Impact. Industrial Relations Journal, Vol. 38, No. 1, pp. 33-50, January 2007, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=958563 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2338.2007.00434.x

Andrew Charlwood (Contact Author)

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) ( email )

Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom
020 7955 7792 (Phone)

University of Leeds - Leeds University Business School (LUBS) ( email )

Maurice Keyworth Building
Leeds LS2 9JT
United Kingdom

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
20
Abstract Views
407
PlumX Metrics