The Price of International Justice

Loyola-LA Legal Studies Paper No. 2007-13

Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals, Vol. 4, No. 2, pp. 281-328, 2005

49 Pages Posted: 15 Feb 2007  

Cesare P.R. Romano

Loyola Law School Los Angeles

Abstract

In 2005, about $420 million were spent on international courts and tribunals. About three fourths of this sum is for international criminal bodies alone. Of those $420 million, about $71 million was paid by the U.S. and $185 by the members of the European Union.

This study aims to diagnose the financial health of the eleven major international courts and tribunals, focusing on the most urgent and significant difficulties faced by each to determine whether governments are allocating the necessary resources to ensure they are able to do their job properly and to determine where action needs to be taken. A series of more general policy-making considerations and recommendations aimed at helping international judicial bodies carry out their assigned mission follows.

Suggested Citation

Romano, Cesare P.R., The Price of International Justice. Loyola-LA Legal Studies Paper No. 2007-13; Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals, Vol. 4, No. 2, pp. 281-328, 2005. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=963441

Cesare P.R. Romano (Contact Author)

Loyola Law School Los Angeles ( email )

919 Albany Street
Los Angeles, CA 90015-1211
United States

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