Tilting at Windmills? Truth and Illusion in the Political Constitution

28 Pages Posted: 8 Mar 2007

See all articles by Thomas M. Poole

Thomas M. Poole

London School of Economics - Law Department

Abstract

This article examines the constitutional scholarship of John Griffith. Centring on Griffith's seminal article "The Political Constitution", the analysis reveals a more complex and pessimistic thinker than the standard image of Benthamite radical would allow. The article then examines the cogency of Griffith's vision - particularly his thesis that rights discourse "corrupts" law and politics - against recent developments. It concludes by reflecting on Griffith's radical debunking style.

Suggested Citation

Poole, Thomas M., Tilting at Windmills? Truth and Illusion in the Political Constitution. Modern Law Review, Vol. 70, No. 2, pp. 250-277, March 2007. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=969160 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2230.2007.00636.x

Thomas M. Poole (Contact Author)

London School of Economics - Law Department ( email )

Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE, WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom

HOME PAGE: http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/law/staff/thomas-poole.htm

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