Defense Costs and Insurer Reserves in Medical Malpractice and Other Personal Injury Cases: Evidence from Texas, 1988-2004

49 Pages Posted: 17 Apr 2008 Last revised: 22 Apr 2010

Bernard S. Black

Northwestern University - Pritzker School of Law; Northwestern University - Kellogg School of Management; European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)

David A. Hyman

Georgetown University

Charles Silver

University of Texas at Austin - School of Law

William M. Sage

University of Texas at Austin School of Law; University of Texas at Austin - Dell Medical School

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: 2008

Abstract

We study defense costs for commercially insured personal injury tort claims in Texas over 1988-2004, and insurer reserves for those costs. We rely on detailed case-level data on defense legal fees and expenses, and Texas state bar data on lawyers' hourly rates. We study medical malpractice ("med mal") cases in detail, and other types of cases in less detail. Controlling for payouts, real defense costs in med mal cases rise by 4.6% per year, roughly doubling over this period. The rate of increase is similar for legal fees and for other expenses. Real hourly rates for personal injury defense counsel are flat.

Defense costs in med mal cases correlate strongly with payouts, both in OLS and in an instrumental variable analysis. They also correlate with the stage at which a case is resolved, and case duration. Mean duration declined over time. Med mal insurers predominantly use outside counsel. Case-level variation in initial expense reserves predicts a small fraction of actual defense costs. In other areas of tort litigation (auto, general commercial, multi-peril, and other professional liability), defense costs rose by 2.2% per year. Defense costs in these cases are predicted by the same factors as in med mal cases, plus the presence of multiple defendants.

Insurer reserving practices raise some puzzles. Med mal insurers did not react to the sustained rise in defense costs by adjusting their expense reserves, either in real dollars or relative to reserves for payouts. Thus, expense reserves declined substantially relative to defense costs. In other litigation areas, expense reserves rose along with defense costs.

Keywords: defense costs, litigation, torts, medical malpractice, insurance

JEL Classification: K13, K32, K41

Suggested Citation

Black, Bernard S. and Hyman, David A. and Silver, Charles and Sage, William M., Defense Costs and Insurer Reserves in Medical Malpractice and Other Personal Injury Cases: Evidence from Texas, 1988-2004 (2008). U Illinois Law & Economics Research Paper No. LE07-012; U of Texas Law, Law and Econ Research Paper No. 99; American Law and Economics Review, Vol. 10, pp. 185-245, 2008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=979163 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.979163

Bernard S. Black (Contact Author)

Northwestern University - Pritzker School of Law ( email )

375 E. Chicago Ave
Chicago, IL 60611
United States
312-503-2784 (Phone)

Northwestern University - Kellogg School of Management

2001 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208
United States
847-491-5049 (Phone)

European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)

Brussels
Belgium

David A. Hyman

Georgetown University ( email )

Washington, DC 20057
United States

Charles M. Silver

University of Texas at Austin - School of Law ( email )

727 East Dean Keeton Street
Austin, TX 78705
United States
512-232-1337 (Phone)
512-232-1372 (Fax)

William Matthew Sage

University of Texas at Austin School of Law ( email )

727 East Dean Keeton Street
Austin, TX 78705
United States

University of Texas at Austin - Dell Medical School ( email )

Austin, TX 78712

Paper statistics

Downloads
580
Rank
36,803
Abstract Views
4,819