From Conquest to Constitutions: Retrieving a Latin American Tradition of the Idea of Human Rights

Human Rights Quarterly, Vol. 25, p. 281, 2003

33 Pages Posted: 8 May 2007

Abstract

This article explores the historical roots of the Latin American region's strong commitment to the idea of universal human rights, focusing on four key intellectual moments: the ethical response to the Spanish conquest; the rights ideology of the continent's liberal republican revolutions; the articulation of social and economic rights in the Mexican Constitution of 1917; and the Latin American contributions to the genesis of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Constructing a narrative from these examples, the article argues for the recognition of a distinct Latin American tradition within the global discourse of human rights.

Keywords: Latin America, regional human rights, history of human rights

Suggested Citation

Carozza, Paolo G., From Conquest to Constitutions: Retrieving a Latin American Tradition of the Idea of Human Rights. Human Rights Quarterly, Vol. 25, p. 281, 2003, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=984953

Paolo G. Carozza (Contact Author)

Notre Dame Law School ( email )

P.O. Box 780
Notre Dame, IN 46556-0780
United States

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