Changes in Workplace Segregation in the United States between 1990 and 2000: Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data

40 Pages Posted: 27 Jun 2007 Last revised: 29 Sep 2010

See all articles by Judith K. Hellerstein

Judith K. Hellerstein

University of Maryland - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

David Neumark

University of California, Irvine - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Melissa McInerney

U.S. Bureau of the Census - Center for Economic Studies; University of Maryland

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Date Written: May 2007

Abstract

We present evidence on changes in workplace segregation by education, race, ethnicity, and sex, from 1990 to 2000. The evidence indicates that racial and ethnic segregation at the workplace level remained quite pervasive in 2000. At the same time, there was fairly substantial segregation by skill, as measured by education. Putting together the 1990 and 2000 data, we find no evidence of declines in workplace segregation by race and ethnicity; indeed, black-white segregation increased. Over this decade, segregation by education also increased. In contrast, workplace segregation by sex fell over the decade, and would have fallen by more had the services industry - a heavily female industry in which sex segregation is relatively high - not experienced rapid employment growth.

Suggested Citation

Hellerstein, Judith K. and Neumark, David and McInerney, Melissa, Changes in Workplace Segregation in the United States between 1990 and 2000: Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data (May 2007). NBER Working Paper No. w13080. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=986930

Judith K. Hellerstein (Contact Author)

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David Neumark

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Melissa McInerney

U.S. Bureau of the Census - Center for Economic Studies ( email )

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University of Maryland

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United States

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