Economic Contributions of Physical Activity Programs to the Publicly Funded Healthcare System

Posted: 21 Jun 2007

See all articles by Nazmi Sari

Nazmi Sari

University of Saskatchewan - Department of Economics

Recep Gezer

University of Saskatchewan

Elizabeth L. Harrison

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Karen Chad

University of Saskatchewan

Nigel Ashworth

Government of Canada - Province of Alberta

Anne Paus Jenssen

University of Saskatchewan

Bruce Reeder

University of Saskatchewan

Suzanne Sheppard

University of Saskatchewan

Koren L. Fisher

University of Saskatchewan

Date Written: May 2007

Abstract

Chronic diseases place a substantial economic burden on the health care system. Total costs of illness, disability and death in Canada due to chronic diseases are more than $80 billion annually. Physical inactivity, poor diet and smoking are considered as the main causes of major chronic diseases. The evidence clearly supports the positive influence of physical activity on health determinants, other health outcomes and quality of life in older adults with chronic illnesses. This implies that an increase in physical activity improves general health status and has the potential to reduce utilization of expensive healthcare services and disability days. Earlier studies showed that physical activity programs would be an effective way of providing preventive care for older adults with chronic conditions. However, there is no study investigating the net economic contributions of different types of physical activity programming to the healthcare system. The aim of this paper is to examine the impacts of class based and home based physical activity programs on healthcare costs, and to estimate the net benefit from these programs. From 2002 to 2003, adults over the age of 50 years, in a mid-size Canadian city, presenting with overweight, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia or osteoarthritis were recruited. Following a screening process, eligible participants were randomly assigned to one the two programs. Validated questionnaires related to health status and quality of life were completed and physical tests were carried out at baseline, 3, 6, 12 month, and annually until year 4 post-intervention. In addition participants' use of physician and hospital services and pharmaceutical expenditures were accessed through their healthcare utilization files for five years, from one year before entrance into the study to four years after the intervention. Using healthcare expenditure data, measures of physical performance, function, physical activity, quality of life and health status, we will estimate the treatment effect for each program, and then extrapolate the net benefit from each intervention.

Keywords: Physical activity, treatment effect

Suggested Citation

Sari, Nazmi and Gezer, Recep and Harrison, Elizabeth L. and Chad, Karen and Ashworth, Nigel and Jenssen, Anne Paus and Reeder, Bruce and Sheppard, Suzanne and Fisher, Koren L., Economic Contributions of Physical Activity Programs to the Publicly Funded Healthcare System (May 2007). iHEA 2007 6th World Congress: Explorations in Health Economics Paper, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=994782

Nazmi Sari (Contact Author)

University of Saskatchewan - Department of Economics ( email )

College of Education
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5A7
Canada

HOME PAGE: http://homepage.usask.ca/~sari/

Recep Gezer

University of Saskatchewan ( email )

College of Education
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5A7
Canada

Elizabeth L. Harrison

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Karen Chad

University of Saskatchewan ( email )

College of Education
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5A7
Canada

Nigel Ashworth

Government of Canada - Province of Alberta ( email )

Alberta
Canada

Anne Paus Jenssen

University of Saskatchewan ( email )

College of Education
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5A7
Canada

Bruce Reeder

University of Saskatchewan ( email )

College of Education
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5A7
Canada

Suzanne Sheppard

University of Saskatchewan ( email )

College of Education
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5A7
Canada

Koren L. Fisher

University of Saskatchewan ( email )

College of Education
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5A7
Canada

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
1,173
PlumX Metrics