The Role of the International Criminal Court in Uganda: Ensuring that the Pursuit of Justice Does Not Come at the Price of Peace

Australian Journal of Peace Studies, Vol. 1, No. 1, 2006

U of Melbourne Legal Studies Research Paper No. 287

22 Pages Posted: 24 Jun 2007  

Louise Parrott

Australian National University (ANU)

Abstract

This article discusses the appropriateness of the International Criminal Court ('ICC') becoming involved in the continuing hostilities in northern Uganda, especially given the potential impact ICC involvement may have on the prospects of peace. Ongoing conflicts such as the one ravaging northern Uganda raise complex issues that were not envisaged by the creators of the Court. The focus of the article is the potentially competing goals of justice and peace. It argues that further guidance is needed to direct the decision of the Prosecutor to continue investigations and that greater emphasis should be placed on the urgent need for a peaceful resolution to the conflict. In order to ensure that criminal prosecutions do not undermine other initiatives to achieve peace, the article proposes that, where possible, prosecutions should run parallel to steps taken at the political level. Otherwise, not only may the future of the ICC be in jeopardy, but so too may the prospects of peace in northern Uganda.

Keywords: International Criminal Court, international criminal law, Uganda, justice, peace

JEL Classification: K00, K10, K30, K40

Suggested Citation

Parrott, Louise, The Role of the International Criminal Court in Uganda: Ensuring that the Pursuit of Justice Does Not Come at the Price of Peace. Australian Journal of Peace Studies, Vol. 1, No. 1, 2006; U of Melbourne Legal Studies Research Paper No. 287. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=996284

Louise Parrott (Contact Author)

Australian National University (ANU) ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 2601
Australia

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