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The Elder Law Studies Journal is sponsored by Syracuse University College of Law, which offers a certificate in Gerontology in cooperation with the Maxwell School of Citizenship & Public Affairs.


Table of Contents

A Behavioural Economics Analysis of Will Making Preferences: When to Begin and Who Should Have the Most Input?

Tina Cockburn, Queensland University of Technology - Faculty of Law
Kelly Purser, Queensland University of Technology - Faculty of Law
Ho Fai Chan, Queensland University of Technology
Bridget J. Crawford, Pace University School of Law
Stephen Whyte, Queensland University of Technology
Uwe Dulleck, Queensland University of Technology - School of Economics and Finance

Improving Access to Justice for Older Victims of Crime by Reimagining Conceptions of Vulnerability

Kevin J. Brown, Queen's University Belfast - School of Law
Faith Gordon, University of Westminster


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"A Behavioural Economics Analysis of Will Making Preferences: When to Begin and Who Should Have the Most Input?" Free Download
Minnesota Journal of International Law, Forthcoming

TINA COCKBURN, Queensland University of Technology - Faculty of Law
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KELLY PURSER, Queensland University of Technology - Faculty of Law
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HO FAI CHAN, Queensland University of Technology
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BRIDGET J. CRAWFORD, Pace University School of Law
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STEPHEN WHYTE, Queensland University of Technology
UWE DULLECK, Queensland University of Technology - School of Economics and Finance
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The global COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need to plan for death, including the transmission of property through a valid will. Surprisingly little is known, however, about when people tend to make wills, how they go about doing so, and whether those practices vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. To begin building a foundation of knowledge, a research team comprised of United States and Australian lawyers and economists recently conducted the first-ever behavioural economics empirical study exploring these questions. This Article reports the results of the teamís survey of both members of the Australian general public and estate planning lawyers in that country. The research aim was to elicit and compare the attitudes of members of both groups on three questions: (1) when people should begin to plan