Table of Contents

A Study on Financial Analysis of Rural Artisans in India: Issues and Challenges

Subhamoy Banik, Calorx Teachers University, K.K. University - Department of Commerce and Management

Tax Evasion with Mobility between the Regular and Irregular Sectors

Xavier Ruiz del Portal, University of Lleida


INSTITUTIONS & TRANSITION ECONOMICS: UNDERGROUND ECONOMY eJOURNAL

"A Study on Financial Analysis of Rural Artisans in India: Issues and Challenges" Free Download
International Journal of Creative Research Thoughts (IJCRT), Volume 5, Issue 4 December 2017 | ISSN: 2320-2882

SUBHAMOY BANIK, Calorx Teachers University, K.K. University - Department of Commerce and Management
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The purpose of this paper is to provide a broad summary of the financial analysis of rural artisans in India and the challenges they are facing. A notable aspect about these rural artisans is that they belong from the unorganised sector. These artisans on one hand are regarded as custodians of the heritage of India and on the other hand deprived of all the modern facilities and financial assistance. This unorganised sector can contribute a lot to the Indian economy by providing employment opportunities, generation of rural income and improving the purchasing power of rural people. The craft and handcraft sector forms the second largest unorganised employment sector in India, second only to agriculture. In India craft can be described not merely an industry but a creation symbolising the inner desire and fulfilment of the community, at present nearly 23 million handcraft people in India today. Some economic policies have been taken by the government to improve the financial positions of these rural artisans and enhancing the socio-economic growth.

"Tax Evasion with Mobility between the Regular and Irregular Sectors" Free Download

XAVIER RUIZ DEL PORTAL, University of Lleida
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This paper incorporates mobility between the legal and black economies into a model of tax evasion with endogenous labor supply in which underreporting is possible in one sector but impossible in the other. We have found that the results of the effects along the extensive margin (number of evaders) become more robust and conclusive than those along the intensive margin (hours of illegal work) usually considered by the literature. In particular, it is shown that the following policies reduce the number of evaders: (a) larger and more progressive evasion penalties; (b) higher detection probabilities; (c) an increase in the legal sector wage rate; (d) a decrease in the moonlighting wage rate; (e) higher costs for creating opportunities to evade; (f) lower opportunities to evade, and (g) greater psychological costs of tax evasion. When tax concealment and illegal work also are taken into account, the effects do not vary significantly under the assumptions in Cowell (1985), except for the fact that policies (a) and (b) only hold as regards low- and middle-income groups and policies (e) and (f) as regards high-income groups.

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INSTITUTIONAL & TRANSITION ECONOMICS EJOURNALS

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Harvard Business School, SSRN, National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI), Harvard University - Accounting & Control Unit
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Institutions & Transition Economics: Underground Economy eJournal

PHILIPPE AGHION
Professor, College de France and London School of Economics and Political Science, Fellow, Fellow, Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR), National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

MASAHIKO AOKI
Professor Emeritus, Senior Fellow, Stanford University

KENNETH J. ARROW
Joan Kenney Professor of Economics, Stanford University - Department of Economics

OLIVIER J. BLANCHARD
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), Peter G. Peterson Institute for International Economics

IRENA GROSFELD
Professor, Paris School of Economics

JANOS KORNAI
Corvinus University of Budapest

GUR OFER
Hebrew University of Jerusalem - Department of Economics

RICHARD PORTES
Professor of Economics, London Business School - Department of Economics, Fellow, Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR), National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

YINGYI QIAN
Dean, Tsinghua University - School of Economics & Management, Fellow, Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

GÉRARD ROLAND
Professor of Economics and Political Science, University of California, Berkeley - Department of Economics, Fellow, Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

JEFFREY D. SACHS
Professor and Director, Columbia University - Columbia Earth Institute, National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

ANDREI SHLEIFER
Professor of Economics, Harvard University - Department of Economics, Fellow, National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), Fellow, European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)

HANS-WERNER SINN
CEO, CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute), Fellow, National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), Director, Center for Economic Studies, Professor, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich

JAN SVEJNAR
School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University, NY, USA, CEPR, IZA, CERGE-EI, University of Ljubljana