Table of Contents

Authorial Control of the Supreme Court

Ã?lvaro E. Bustos, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile
Emerson H. Tiller, Northwestern University - Pritzker School of Law

The Effect of Online Technologies on Dispute Resolution System Design: Antecedents, Current Trends and Future Directions

Ayelet Sela, Bar Ilan University Faculty of Law

Regdata 3.0 User's Guide

Patrick A. McLaughlin, George Mason University - Mercatus Center
Oliver Sherouse, Mercatus Center
Daniel Francis, George Mason University - Mercatus Center
Michael Gasvoda, George Mason University - Mercatus Center
Jonathan Nelson, George Mason University - Mercatus Center
Stephen Strosko, George Mason University - Mercatus Center
Tyler Richards, George Mason University - Mercatus Center

Citation Analysis of the Journal of Entrepreneurship

Vaishnav S Nupur, Entrepreneurship Development Institute of India (EDI)
Ganapathi Batthini, Entrepreneurship Development Institute of India

Research: The Good, the Bad, and the Anxious

Emma Wood, University of Massachusetts School of Law at Dartmouth

A Model Code of Conduct for Student-Edited Law-Journal Submissions

Scott Dodson, University of California Hastings College of the Law
Jacob Hirsch, University of California, Hastings College of the Law, Students


LEGAL INFORMATION & TECHNOLOGY eJOURNAL

"Authorial Control of the Supreme Court" Free Download
Northwestern Law & Econ Research Paper No. 17-12

Ã?LVARO E. BUSTOS, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile
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EMERSON H. TILLER, Northwestern University - Pritzker School of Law
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The Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court authors many of the most important opinions coming out of the Court. The prestige of authoring an important policy decision, and the value that such an opinion adds to the legacy of the Chief Justice’s Court, plays an important and strategic role in the Court’s opinion authorship dynamics and the policy outcomes of the Court. We present a Supreme Court decision-making model that, within the confines of legal doctrine, incorporates the authorship utility of the Chief Justice (and senior associate justices who hold secondary, yet important, property rights over authorship). New predictions emerge about who authors the Court’s opinion, what case outcome is chosen by the justices, which legal doctrines are chosen, and which decisions are unanimous among the justices. We illustrate aspects of the model with recent Supreme Court decisions involving health care and campaign financing.

"The Effect of Online Technologies on Dispute Resolution System Design: Antecedents, Current Trends and Future Directions" Free Download
Lewis & Clark Law Review, Forthcoming

AYELET SELA, Bar Ilan University Faculty of Law
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Online dispute resolution (ODR) technologies are now increasingly used by courts, administrative agencies, companies and alternative dispute resolution (ADR) organizations to handle cases in various legal domains. Two decades have passed since the first ODR systems were launched and their impact on access to justice and the delivery of justice has evolved to a great extent. This Article offers an overview and analysis of these developments. First, it discusses the pragmatic and ideological antecedents of ODR: developments in information technology and online activity, and the rise of the effective access to justice and alternative dispute resolution movements. Second, it proposes a typological framework for evaluating ODR systems in terms of dispute types, resolution methods, settings, technologies, providers, and process designs. It then uses the framework to systematically analyze the current landscape of ODR, offering specific examples of ODR systems that demonstrate the effects that technology has had on dispute resolution process design: procedural transposition, restructuring and novelty. The Article closes with a critical discussion of current trends and future directions of ODR, including transition from private to public ODR, hybrid process designs, crowd-sourced cyber-juries, connecting ODR with reputation systems, and data-driven ODR learning systems.

"Regdata 3.0 User's Guide" Free Download

PATRICK A. MCLAUGHLIN, George Mason University - Mercatus Center
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OLIVER SHEROUSE, Mercatus Center
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DANIEL FRANCIS, George Mason University - Mercatus Center
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MICHAEL GASVODA, George Mason University - Mercatus Center
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JONATHAN NELSON, George Mason University - Mercatus Center
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STEPHEN STROSKO, George Mason University - Mercatus Center
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TYLER RICHARDS, George Mason University - Mercatus Center
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We describe RegData 3.0, a database released by the RegData Project at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University on August 31, 2017, for the purpose of facilitating third-party usage. We explain the primary features of the database, describe the methodology used to build it, and list the pre-made datasets available for download from the RegData 3.0 database.

"Citation Analysis of the Journal of Entrepreneurship" Free Download
Library Technologies, Services & Resources - Current Global Trends (2017); ISBN: 978-93-86724-07-6

VAISHNAV S NUPUR, Entrepreneurship Development Institute of India (EDI)
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GANAPATHI BATTHINI, Entrepreneurship Development Institute of India
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Since 1992 the JoE has been playing a vital role in dissemination of entrepreneurship related information all over the world. The JoE has 25 Volumes (50 issues) published between 1992 and 2016 (i.e. Volume 1 Number 1 to Volume 25 Number 2). This paper intends to bring out the results of a Citation Analysis study carried out on the articles of the issues of the JoE from Volume 21 to 25 i.e. 2012-16. A total 2685 citations appended to 55 articles published during 2012-2016. The analysis includes the bibliographic forms of the cited documents, authorship pattern, language, journals list, etc. The study is found to be useful to manage the information resources and services not only in the field of Entrepreneurship but also for Library and Information Centres. The finding reveals that more than 70% of the citations were from journals and a majority of the articles are contributed by two authors, i.e. 40.08%. Journal of Business Venturing is cited the most (7.62%) and the self-citation percentage for JoE is 2.70%.

"Research: The Good, the Bad, and the Anxious" Free Download
College and Research Libraries News, Vol 78, No 9, pg. 514 (2017)

EMMA WOOD, University of Massachusetts School of Law at Dartmouth
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In research and in life, human beings are prone to uncertainty and susceptible to the circular thinking of worry. According to the DSM-5, anxiety is anticipation of future threat. Sometimes that threat comes in the form of an overlooked article or a feeble bibliography, darkening the sky of a promising idea for a scholarly endeavor. Anxiety is characterized by excessive concern and distress which can manifest itself in symptoms such as checking and obsessing. The obstacles that are met along the research trail can send up red flags in the brain that lead researchers to check and recheck the same sources and obsess over the unknown. The processes of finding answers are, of course, tied to unknowing, and in that unknowing is a hotbed for apprehension. Some of the remedies for anxiety may be applied to research, probably not Xanax, but certainly a heavy dose of acceptance.

"A Model Code of Conduct for Student-Edited Law-Journal Submissions" Free Download
67 Journal of Legal Education (2018), Forthcoming
UC Hastings Research Paper No. 253

SCOTT DODSON, University of California Hastings College of the Law
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JACOB HIRSCH, University of California, Hastings College of the Law, Students
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Although much commentary covers the peculiar American institution of the student-edited law review, the literature fails to develop detailed norms governing author and journal conduct during the submission process. This essay sets out a Model Code of Conduct for journal submissions. It addresses all phases of the submission process, from pre-submission journal disclosures to post-acceptance conduct. The hope is that the rules contained in the Model Code will spur norm development in an area badly in need of guidance. This paper is coauthored with Jacob Hirsch, the current Executive Articles Editor of Hastings Law Journal.

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This eJournal distributes working and accepted paper abstracts in all areas of legal information scholarship. Topics include (but are not limited to): 1) the impact of legal information on domestic, comparative, and international legal systems; 2) the treatment of legal information authorities and precedents (e.g., citation studies); 3) the examination of rules, practices, and commentary limiting or expanding applications of legal information (e.g., citation to unpublished opinions and to foreign law); 4) the study of economic, legal, political and social conditions limiting or extending access to legal information (e.g., trends in the legal publishing industry, intellectual property regimes, and open access initiatives); 5) the finding and use of legal information by academics to produce legal scholarship, by law students to learn the law, by attorneys in practice, and by judges and others decisionmakers to determine legal outcomes; 6) the history of legal information systems and technological advancements; 7) legal information system design and assessment; and 8) the relationship of substantive areas of law (such as information law, intellectual freedom, intellectual property, and national security law) and other academic disciplines (e.g., information science) to legal information. This includes the scholarship of law librarians, other legal scholars, and other academic disciplines.

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Legal Information & Technology eJournal

DUNCAN ALFORD
Associate Dean/ Director of the Law Library, University of South Carolina School of Law, Associate Dean for the Law Library & Associate Professor of Law, University of South Carolina - Coleman Karesh Law Library

BARBARA BINTLIFF
Professor, University of Texas School of Law

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RICHARD A. DANNER
Rufty Research Professor of Law & Senior Associate Dean for Information Services, Duke University School of Law

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Assistant Professor of Law and Director of Library Services, Emory University School of Law - Hugh F. MacMillan Law Library

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MARCI HOFFMAN
International & Foreign Law Librarian, University of California School of Law Library - Boalt Hall Law Library

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JANET SINDER
Library Director and Associate Professor, Brooklyn Law School