Gender Variations of Physiological and Psychological Stress Among Police Officers

34 Pages Posted: 3 Nov 2009

See all articles by Martin Gächter

Martin Gächter

University of Innsbruck - Department of Economics & Statistics; Oesterreichische Nationalbank (OeNB), Foreign Research Division

David A. Savage

Queensland University of Technology; QuBE; CEDM

Benno Torgler

Queensland University of Technology; CREMA; CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute for Economic Research)

Date Written: October 2, 2009

Abstract

This paper analyses the effect of gender on reported and perceived levels of stress through examination of both the physical and psychological indicators. It may be interesting to work with police data due to high stress levels among police officers and the fact that the work environment is male dominant (females are a minority). In our study we not only explore gender differences, but also whether job and private environmental factors such as effective cooperation between units, a higher trust in the work partner, a higher level of work-life-balance and home stability, and a higher level of interactional fairness, affect female and male officers differently.

Using multivariate regression analysis of police officers we find that female officers are significantly more likely to report suffering from physical stress indicators than their male counterparts while no gender differences are observable in regards to psychological stress.

Moreover, a higher level of trust and cooperation, and a higher level of interactional fairness at work are not able to absorb physical stress among female, while these factors have a strong impact on male officers. On the other hand, for both, female and male officers, work-life balance and stability at home have the tendency of reducing physical stress.

Keywords: Gender, Stress, Police Officers, Burnout, Work-life Balance, Justice

JEL Classification: I10, I12, I31, J24, J81, Z130

Suggested Citation

Gächter, Martin and Savage, David A. and Torgler, Benno, Gender Variations of Physiological and Psychological Stress Among Police Officers (October 2, 2009). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1498187 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1498187

Martin Gächter

University of Innsbruck - Department of Economics & Statistics ( email )

Universitaetsstrasse 15/4
Innsbruck, 6020
Austria
+43 512 507 7164 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.uibk.ac.at

Oesterreichische Nationalbank (OeNB), Foreign Research Division ( email )

Otto-Wagner-Platz 3
1090 Vienna
Austria

David A. Savage (Contact Author)

Queensland University of Technology ( email )

GPO Box 2434
2 George Street
Brisbane, Queensland 4001
Australia

QuBE ( email )

2 George Street
GPO Box 2434
Brisbane, 4510
Australia

CEDM ( email )

Brisbane, 4001
Australia

Benno Torgler

Queensland University of Technology ( email )

GPO Box 2434
2 George Street
Brisbane, Queensland 4001
Australia

CREMA

Gellertstrasse 18
Basel
Zurich, CH 8006
Switzerland

CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute for Economic Research)

Poschinger Str. 5
Munich, DE-81679
Germany

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