Brain Imaging and Courtroom Deception

Hastings Center Report , Vol. 40, No. 6 p. 7, 2010

Washington University in St. Louis Legal Studies Research Paper No. 10-12-04

3 Pages Posted: 19 Feb 2011  

Rebecca Dresser

Washington University in Saint Louis - School of Law

Date Written: November 1, 2010

Abstract

Scientists have developed new approaches to lie detection that use a brain scanning technique called functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to evaluate whether someone is lying. Enthusiasts hope that courts will be more receptive to fMRI lie detection techniques than they have been to polygraph tests. But two recent court decisions - United States v. Semrau and Wilson v. Corestaff Services - suggest that these techniques are far from ready for courtroom use.

Suggested Citation

Dresser, Rebecca, Brain Imaging and Courtroom Deception (November 1, 2010). Hastings Center Report , Vol. 40, No. 6 p. 7, 2010; Washington University in St. Louis Legal Studies Research Paper No. 10-12-04. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1763304

Rebecca Dresser (Contact Author)

Washington University in Saint Louis - School of Law ( email )

Campus Box 1120
St. Louis, MO 63130
United States

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