Accounting for the Rise in C-Sections: Evidence from Population Level Data

52 Pages Posted: 16 Mar 2015 Last revised: 11 Jun 2023

See all articles by Sara Allin

Sara Allin

University of Toronto

Michael Baker

University of Toronto - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Maripier Isabelle

University of Toronto - Department of Economics

Mark Stabile

INSEAD; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: March 2015

Abstract

Drawing on administrative records of nearly 4 million births in Canada as well as macro data from the US and Australia, we provide a comprehensive account of rising C-section rates. We explicitly consider the contributions of the changing characteristics of mothers, births, and physicians as well as changing financial incentives for C-section deliveries. These factors account for at most one-half of the increase in C-section rates. The majority of the remaining increase in C-sections over the period 1994-2011 occurred in the early 2000s. We overview the relative contributions that the Hannah Breech Trial and technological change may have played in this development.

Suggested Citation

Allin, Sara and Baker, Michael and Isabelle, Maripier and Stabile, Mark, Accounting for the Rise in C-Sections: Evidence from Population Level Data (March 2015). NBER Working Paper No. w21022, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2578870

Sara Allin (Contact Author)

University of Toronto ( email )

105 St George Street
Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8
Canada

Michael Baker

University of Toronto - Department of Economics ( email )

150 St. George Street
Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G7
Canada
416-978-4138 (Phone)
416-978-6713 (Fax)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Maripier Isabelle

University of Toronto - Department of Economics ( email )

150 St. George Street
Toronto, Ontario M5S3G7
Canada

Mark Stabile

INSEAD ( email )

Boulevard de Constance
F-77305 Fontainebleau Cedex
France

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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