The Economics of Protecting Tiger Populations: Linking Household Behaviour to Poaching and Prey Depletion

CIES Working Paper No. 0140

36 Pages Posted: 8 Jan 2002

See all articles by Richard Damania

Richard Damania

World Bank; University of Adelaide - School of Economics

Randy Stringer

University of Adelaide - Centre for International Economic Studies (CIES)

K. Ullas Karanth

Wildlife Conservation Society, International Programs

Brad Stith

U.S. Geological Survey, Florida Caribbean Science Center

Date Written: November 2001

Abstract

The tiger (Panthera tigris) is classified as endangered (IUCN, 2000). The population of wild tigers continues to decline, despite substantial conservation investments by governments and international agencies. This paper presents a formal economic analysis of the two most imminent threats to the survival of wild tigers: poaching of wild tigers and hunting their prey. A model is developed to examine the interactions between wild tiger and farm households living in and around tiger habitats. The analysis extends the most recent model of tiger demography to incorporate predator-prey interactions and explores the sensitivity of tiger populations to key economic parameters. To our knowledge this is the first formal investigation into the economic causes of declining tiger populations. It is hoped that the analysis may contribute to the policy debate on how best to protect one of the world's most endangered wild cats.

Suggested Citation

Damania, Richard and Stringer, Randy and Karanth, K. Ullas and Stith, Brad, The Economics of Protecting Tiger Populations: Linking Household Behaviour to Poaching and Prey Depletion (November 2001). CIES Working Paper No. 0140. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=295494 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.295494

Richard Damania (Contact Author)

World Bank ( email )

1818 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20433
United States

University of Adelaide - School of Economics ( email )

Adelaide SA, 5005
Australia
+61 8 8303 4933 (Phone)
+61 8 8223 1460 (Fax)

Randy Stringer

University of Adelaide - Centre for International Economic Studies (CIES) ( email )

Adelaide SA5005
Australia
+61 8 8303 4821 (Phone)
+61 8 8223 1460 (Fax)

K. Ullas Karanth

Wildlife Conservation Society, International Programs ( email )

Bronx, NY 10460
United States

Brad Stith

U.S. Geological Survey, Florida Caribbean Science Center ( email )

Sirenia Project
412 NE 16th Ave., Rm 250
Gainesville, FL 32601
United States

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