Transfers, Nutrition Programming, and Economic Well-Being: Experimental Evidence from Bangladesh

IFPRI Discussion Paper 1879

41 Pages Posted: 18 Nov 2019

See all articles by Akhter U. Ahmed

Akhter U. Ahmed

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

John Hoddinott

Cornell University - Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management

Shalini Roy

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

Esha Sraboni

Brown University - Department of Sociology

Date Written: October 24, 2019

Abstract

Interest has grown in leveraging cash transfer programs with nutrition interventions to improve child nutrition at scale. However, little is known about how doing so affects household economic well-being. We study a program providing cash or food transfers, with or without nutrition behavior change communication (BCC), to poor women in rural Bangladesh. We find that adding BCC to cash or food transfers leads to larger impacts on both consumption and assets - an apparent puzzle, given the transfer value is unchanged. Evidence suggests this occurs through the BCC inducing increases in income generation - plausibly by improving households’ social capital and empowerment.

Keywords: nutrition; children; economics; behaviour; social capital; empowerment; food security; social protection; assets; livelihoods

Suggested Citation

Ahmed, Akhter U. and Hoddinott, John and Roy, Shalini and Sraboni, Esha, Transfers, Nutrition Programming, and Economic Well-Being: Experimental Evidence from Bangladesh (October 24, 2019). IFPRI Discussion Paper 1879, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3479151

Akhter U. Ahmed (Contact Author)

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) ( email )

1201 Eye St, NW,
Washington, DC 20005
United States

John Hoddinott

Cornell University - Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management ( email )

Ithaca, NY
United States

Shalini Roy

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) ( email )

1201 Eye St, NW,
Washington, DC 20005
United States

Esha Sraboni

Brown University - Department of Sociology ( email )

Providence, RI
United States

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