Ethnic Self-Identification of First-Generation Immigrants

20 Pages Posted: 17 Jan 2007

See all articles by Laura Zimmermann

Laura Zimmermann

IZA Institute of Labor Economics; University of Oxford

Klaus F. Zimmermann

Global Labor Organization (GLO); UNU-MERIT; Maastricht University, Department of Economics; Free University Berlin; University of Bonn; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); Journal of Population Economics

Amelie F. Constant

Princeton University; UNU-MERIT; CESifo

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: December 2006

Abstract

This paper uses the concept of ethnic self-identification of immigrants in a two-dimensional framework. It acknowledges the fact that attachments to the home and the host country are not necessarily mutually exclusive. There are three possible paths of adjustment from separation at entry, namely the transitions to assimilation, integration and marginalization. We analyze the determinants of ethnic self-identification in this process using samples of first-generation immigrants for males and females separately, and controlling for pre- and post-migration characteristics. We find strong gender differences and the unimportance of a wide range of pre-migration characteristics like religion and education at home.

Keywords: ethnic self-identification, first-generation immigrants, gender, ethnicity

JEL Classification: F22, J15, J16, Z10

Suggested Citation

Zimmermann, Laura and Zimmermann, Klaus F. and Constant, Amelie F., Ethnic Self-Identification of First-Generation Immigrants (December 2006). IZA Discussion Paper No. 2535, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=957244

Laura Zimmermann

IZA Institute of Labor Economics ( email )

P.O. Box 7240
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University of Oxford

Oxford
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Klaus F. Zimmermann (Contact Author)

Global Labor Organization (GLO) ( email )

Bonn
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UNU-MERIT ( email )

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Maastricht University, Department of Economics ( email )

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Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

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Amelie F. Constant

Princeton University ( email )

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