What Factors Influence the Earnings of GPs and Medical Specialists in Australia? Evidence from the MABEL Survey

Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series No. 12-10

33 Pages Posted: 9 Aug 2010

See all articles by Terence Chai Cheng

Terence Chai Cheng

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economics and Social Research

Anthony Scott

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research

Sung-Hee Jeon

Statistics Canada; University of Melbourne

Guyonne R.J. Kalb

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research; IZA; ARC Centre of Excellence for Children and Families over the Life Course

Catherine Joyce

Monash University - Epidemiology & Preventive Medicine

John Humphreys

Monash University - Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Date Written: August 9, 2010

Abstract

To date, there has been little data or empirical research on the determinants of doctors’ earnings despite earnings having an important role in influencing the cost of health care, decisions on workforce participation and labour supply. This paper examines the determinants of annual earnings of general practitioners and specialists using the first wave of the Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL), a new longitudinal survey of doctors in Australia. For both GPs and specialists, earnings are higher for men, for those who are self-employed, who do after hours or on-call work, and who work in areas with a high cost of living. GPs have higher earnings if they work in larger practices, in outer regional or rural areas, and in areas with lower GP density, whilst specialists earn more if they are a fellow of their college, have more working experience, spend more time in clinical work, have less complex patients, or work in inner regional areas. Overall, GPs earn about 32% less than specialists. The returns from on-call work, experience, and self-employment are higher for specialists compared to GPs.

Suggested Citation

Cheng, Terence Chai and Scott, Anthony and Jeon, Sung-Hee and Kalb, Guyonne R.J. and Joyce, Catherine and Humphreys, John, What Factors Influence the Earnings of GPs and Medical Specialists in Australia? Evidence from the MABEL Survey (August 9, 2010). Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series No. 12-10. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1656103 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1656103

Terence Chai Cheng

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economics and Social Research ( email )

185 Pelham Street
Carlton, Victoria 3053
Australia

Anthony Scott (Contact Author)

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research ( email )

Level 5, FBE Building, 111 Barry Street
Parkville, Victoria 3010
Australia

Sung-Hee Jeon

Statistics Canada ( email )

Ottawa, Ontario
Canada

University of Melbourne ( email )

185 Pelham Street
Carlton, Victoria 3053
Australia

Guyonne R.J. Kalb

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research ( email )

Level 5, FBE Building, 111 Barry Street
Parkville, Victoria 3010
Australia

IZA ( email )

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

ARC Centre of Excellence for Children and Families over the Life Course ( email )

185 Pelham Street
Carlton, 3053
Australia

Catherine Joyce

Monash University - Epidemiology & Preventive Medicine ( email )

99 Commercial Road
Melbourne Victoria 3004
Australia

John Humphreys

Monash University - Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences ( email )

Victoria 3800
Australia

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
113
Abstract Views
857
rank
248,879
PlumX Metrics